A report into the Politicisation of Clinical Psychology Training Courses

I am very pleased to have contributed to a report examining the extent to which UK clinical psychology training courses have been taken over by political ideology. Unfortunately, the news isn’t good. We found that all courses have adopted a politicised stance in their teaching of clinical psychology – an approach that is exceptionally dangerous for both training and patient care.

Our report has been mentioned in The Critic, Cieo, Critical Therapy Antidote and Psychreg.

To view the full report, see here.

Publication in British Journal of Clinical Psychology

My colleagues and I recently had a paper published in the British Journal of Clinical Psychology. Our paper, ‘On the reciprocal effects between multiple group identifications and mental health: A longitudinal study of Scottish adolescents’ is my fourth publication from my PhD research, and I would like to once again, thank the pupils and staff who contributed to it.

Our paper examines the link between social group identifications and mental health outcomes in high school students. We found that greater number of high group identifications predicted better mental health outcomes amongst students. However, we also found that better mental health also predicted greater number of high group identifications, suggesting that there is a cyclical relationship between both variables.

The findings highlight the importance of conceptualizing the link between group identification and mental health as cyclical, rather than unidirectional. This reconceptualization has implications for mental health promotion strategies, as it highlights the importance of attempting to turn a potentially ‘vicious cycle’ of social disidentification and mental ill health into a ‘virtuous cycle’ of social identification and mental health.

To view the paper, please see:

Miller, K., Wakefield, J. R. H., & Sani, F. (2017). On the reciprocal effects between multiple group identifications and mental health: A longitudinal study of Scottish adolescents. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, DOI:10.1111/bjc.12143.